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Since May 10th 2008


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Sambucus nigra

Serenoa repens
Silybum marianum
Syzygium aromaticum
Schisandra chinensis
Scutellaria baicalensis
Sonchus arvensis


 

 

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Sonchus arvensis L (Asteraceae/Compositae)

Synonyms

Local names
Perennial sow thistle, tempuyung, field sowthistle, niu she tou, laitron des champs

Description
A deep-rooted perennial herb, perennial sowthistle has erect, hollow stems with bitter, milky juice. The stems, which can be 1 1/2 to six feet tall, branch only at the top of the plant. The alternate leaves are variable in size with prickly edges and pointed lobes. The stem leaves are clasping and without stalks. The bright yellow flowers occur in heads that can be 1 1/2 to two inches wide when in full bloom. The flowers, which have five small teeth across the outer end, open two to three hours after sunrise and close around noon. The bracts beneath the flower are green and bristly with sticky hairs. A plant may have 20 heads during the flowering season from June to September, but usually only a few flowers at the same time. The oblong, dark-reddish seeds have five lengthwise ribs and a tuft of white, silky, parachute-like hairs that can carry it in the wind.

Plant material used
Whole aerial plant

Major chemical constituents
luteolin 7-0-glycoside, apigenin 7-0-glycoside, , Isocynaroside, Sonchoside, 3,4,7-trihydm lavone and its derivatives, uteolin, quercetin-3-O-glucosidase, 3 ß-hydroxy-12-enoic acid, - methoxy-acid, - Hydroxyphenyl acid. entacylic triterpenes; triterpenes account for about 6% of the crude lipid extract or 0.2% of the dried plant. Composition of the triterpenoid fraction, as indicated by gas chromatography of the corresponding acetates, was a-amyrin (9%), ß-amyrin (21%), lupeol (13%), taraxasterol (24%) and pseudo-taraxasterol (12%). A single, long-chain alcohol (16%) was also present

Dosage forms
Dried plant made into decoction

Medicinal uses
Uses supported by clinical data
No data available

Uses described in pharmacopoeias and well established documents
Diuretic and anti-kidney stone

Uses described in traditional medicine
Kidney stone, gallstone, dysentri, haemorrhoid, Gout arthritis, apendicitis, mastitis, hypertension, burn wound, bruises.

Proven pharmacological activity
Animal studies
Diuretic and anti-kidney stone, hepatoprotectant. larvacidal

Human studies
No data available

Toxicity
LD50 >5000mg/kg bb (Acute and subchronic toxicity tests in rat), elevation in SGOT, SGPT, kreatinin, and ureum, but insignificant. 90 consecutive days multiple dose on rat is categorized as safe.

Contraindications
No data available

Warnings
Better be avoided under severe renal or hepatic impairment

Precautions
Drug interactions
No data available

Laboratory test interactions
No data available

Carcinogenesis, mutagenesis
No data available

Pregnancy
No data available, therefore it should be avoided during pregnancy

Nursing mothers
No data available, therefore it should be avoided during lactation

Paediatric use
No data available, therefore it should be avoided for children

Adverse reactions
No data available

Posology
250 mg of dried plant boiled with 250 ml of water until 150 ml left, let cool then filter with clean cloth. Divide into 3 equal volume for one day.

 

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