WELCOME

You're visitor number free hit counters login pageVisit the web design companies directory.

Since May 10th 2008


Initial O



Ocimum sanctum
Oenothera biennis


 

 

Herb`s Initial
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Click one of the letter above, then click on one of the herb on the left panel
or type a keyword below, and hit search button

 



Oenothera biennis L. (Onagraceae).

Synonyms
Oenothera communis Léveillé, Oenothera graveolens Gilib., Onagra biennis Scop., Onagra vulgaris Spach.

Local names
Enotera, evening primrose, hhashyshat el hhimar, king’s cureall, la belle de nuit, ligetszépeolaj, mematsuyoigusa, Nachtkerzenöl, onagre, raghan-e gole magrebi, teunisbloem

Description
A biennial or occasionally an annual, up to 1.25 m high. Thick yellowish conical root produces compressed rosettes of obtuse basal leaves, from which arise much-branched reddish, rough stems; stems bear alternate, lanceolate to ovate, entire, 4 cm long, short petioled leaves. Flowers very fragrant, 3–5 cm in diameter, yellow, erect on spikes, 4-petalled; open in the evening and wilt after 1 night. Seed pods contain many small reddish-brown seeds. Plant hybridizes easily

Plant material used
fixed oil obtained from the seeds

Chemical assays
Concentration limits of linoleic acid (cis-linoleic acid) and γ-linolenic acid (cis-glinolenic acid) need to be established. However, based on literature data, values of not less than 60% and 7%, respectively, may be considered. A gas chromatography method is available for quantitative analysis

Major chemical constituents
The major constituents are linoleic acid (cis-linoleic acid) (65–80%), γ-linolenic acid (cis-γ-linolenic acid) (8–14%), oleic acid (6–11%), palmitic acid (7–10%) and stearic acid (1.5–3.5%). Other constituents include sterols and triterpene alcohols

Medicinal uses
Uses supported by clinical data
Internally for symptomatic treatment of atopic eczema, diabetic neuropathy, and mastalgia. Clinical evidence for its use in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis is conflicting, as are the results of trials in women with premenstrual syndrome. Further well-designed clinical trials are needed to clarify these data. The results from clinical trials do not support the use of Oleum Oenotherae Biennis for the treatment of climacteric symptoms or psoriasis.

Uses described in pharmacopoeias and well established documents
Topical use for the treatment of minor bruises and wounds.

Uses described in traditional medicine
Taken internally for the treatment of asthma, coughs, gastrointestinal disorders, pain and whooping cough

Proven pharmacological activity
Animal studies
Anti-allergic, Reduce cholesterol and triglyceride, Inhibition of platelet aggregation, Antihypertensive, Antiulcer, Antiarthritic, Neurotrophic, Anti-embryotoxic

Human studies
Atopic eczema, Rheumatoid arthritis, Premenstrual syndrome, Mastalgia, Diabetic neuropathy, Menopausal flushing, Uraemic skin disorders

Contraindications
No information available.

Warnings
Oleum Oenotherae Biennis may precipitate symptoms of undiagnosed temporal lobe epilepsy, particularly in schizophrenic patients or patients taking epileptogenic drugs such as phenothiazines.

Precautions
General
Oleum Oenotherae Biennis should be used with caution in patients with a history of epilepsy, particularly those with schizophrenia, or those taking epileptogenic drugs such as phenothiazines.

Drug interactions
Oleum Oenotherae Biennis inhibited platelet aggregation in animals and inhibited platelet-activating factor in humans. Therefore, patients taking anticoagulant drugs in conjunction with the fixed oil should be closely monitored.

Other precautions
No information available on general precautions or precautions concerning drug and laboratory test interactions; carcinogenesis, mutagenesis, impairment of fertility; teratogenic and non-teratogenic effects in pregnancy; nursing mothers; or paediatric use. Therefore, Oleum Oenotherae Biennis should not be administered during pregnancy or lactation or to children without medical supervision.

Adverse reactions
Headaches, nausea, loose stools and diarrhoea following treatment with Oleum Oenotherae Biennis have been reported. Administration of the fixed oil precipitated symptoms of undiagnosed temporal lobe epilepsy in schizophrenic patients taking epileptogenic drugs, in particular phenothiazines.

Dosage forms
Fixed oil, neat or in capsule form. Store in a well-filled, airtight glass container, protected from heat and light.

Posology
(Unless otherwise indicated)
Daily dosage: 320–480 mg fixed oil (calculated as g-linolenic acid) in divided doses for atopic eczema, and 240–320 mg in divided doses for mastalgia

 

Herbal products and services


 

 

 

 

 

Copyright GREEN RING SOCIETY 2008