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Initial H



Hamamelis virginiana

Hypericum perforatum
Harpagophytum procumbens
Humulus lupulus
Hydrastis canadensis


 

 

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Harpagophytum procumbens DC. ex Meiss. (Pedaliaceae)

Synonyms
Harpagophytum burcherllii Decne

Local names
Afrikanische Teufelskralle, beesdubbeltjie, devil’s claw, duiwelsklou, grapple plant, grapple vine, harpagophytum, kanako, khams, khuripe, legatapitse, sengaparele, Teufelskralle, Trampelklette, wood spider xwate

Description
Prostrate perennial mat-forming herb, up to 1.5 m across. Tuber up to 6 cm in diameter, bark yellowish-brown, longitudinally striated. Leaves pinnately lobed and clothed with glandular hairs, the underside densely pubescent. Flowers bright red, solitary, rising abruptly from the leaf axils; corolla pentamerous, tubular, pink-purple, up to 7 cm long; androecium of four stamens with one staminodium. Fruits characteristically large, hooked, claw-like, tardily dehiscent two-locular capsules, flattened at right angles to the septum, the edges bearing two rows of woody arms up to 8 cm long with recurved spines

Plant material used
dried, tuberous, secondary roots

Chemical assays
Contains not less than 1.2% harpagoside as determined by high-performance liquid chromatography

Major chemical constituents
The major active constituents are harpagoside and the related iridoid glycosides, harpagide and procumbide, which occur in lesser amounts. Total iridoid glycoside content 0.5–3.3%

Medicinal uses
Uses supported by clinical data
Treatment of pain associated with rheumatic conditions

Uses described in pharmacopoeias and well established documents
Treatment of loss of appetite and dyspeptic complaints; supportive treatment of degenerative rheumatism, painful arthrosis and tendonitis.

Uses described in traditional medicine
Treatment of allergies, boils, diabetes, liver disorders and sores

Proven pharmacological activity
Animal studies
Anti-inflammatory and analgesic, Antiarrhythmic

Human studies
Antidyspeptic, Anti-inflammatory and analgesic

Adverse reactions
Mild and infrequent gastrointestinal symptoms were reported in clinical trials

Contraindications
Radix Harpagophyti is contraindicated in gastric and duodenal ulcers, and cases of known hypersensitivity to the roots. Owing to a lack of safety data, Radix Harpagophyti should not be used during pregnancy and nursing.

Warnings
No information available.

Precautions
General
Patients with gallstones should consult a physician prior to using the roots.

Drug interactions
An extract of the roots did not inhibit the activity of cytochrome P450 isoform 3A4 in vitro, suggesting that Radix Harpagophyti would not interact with prescription drugs metabolized by this enzyme

Pregnancy: non-teratogenic effects
See Contraindications.

Nursing mothers
See Contraindications.

Other precautions
No information available on precautions concerning drug and laboratory test interactions; carcinogenesis, mutagenesis, impairment of fertility; teratogenic effects during pregnancy; or paediatric use.

Dosage forms
Dried roots for decoctions and teas; powdered roots or extract in capsules, tablets, tinctures and ointments. Store in a well closed container, protected from light.

Posology
(Unless otherwise indicated)
Daily dose: for loss of appetite 1.5 g of the roots in a decoction, 3 ml of tincture (1:10, 25% ethanol); for painful arthrosis or tendonitis 1.5– 3 g of the roots in a decoction, three times, 1–3 g of the roots or equivalent aqueous or hydroalcoholic extracts

 

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