WELCOME

You're visitor number free hit counters login pageVisit the web design companies directory.

Since May 10th 2008


Initial C



Cassia senna

Centella asiatica
Chamomilla recutita
Cinnamomum verum
Coptis chinensis
Curcuma longa
Calendula officinalis
Cimicifuga racemosa
Crataegus monogyna
Carthamus tinctorius
Cephaelis ipecacuanha
Commiphora molmol
Commiphora mukul
Crocus sativus
Cordyceps sinensis
Cyperus rotundus


 

 

Herb`s Initial
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Click one of the letter above, then click on one of the herb on the left panel
or type a keyword below, and hit search button

 



Untitled Document Centella asiatica (L.) Urban. (Apiaceae/Umbelliferae)

Synonyms
Centella coriacea Nannfd., Hydrocotyle asiatica L., Hydrocotyle lunata Lam. and Trisanthus cochinchinensis Lour

Local names
Artaniyae-hindi, Asiatic pennywort, barmanimuni, barmi, bhram buti, boabok, bodila-ba-dinku, bokkudu, brahma manduki, brahmi ghi, brahmi-buti, brahmi, bua bok, bua-bok, centella, chhota mani-muni, chi-hsueh-ts’ao, ghibrahmi, ghod tapre, ghodtapre, ghortapre, gotu kola, gotukola, herba pegagan, herba kakikuda, hydrocotyle, hydrocotyle asiatique, idrocotile, imsen korokla, Indian pennywort, Indian water navelwort, Indischer Wassernabel, karinga, karivana, kudangal, luei gong gen, lièn tièn tháo, mandooka parni, mandukaparni, mandukparni, manimuni, marsh pepperwort, matoyahuho, matoyahuhu, mrang-khua, mtwigahuwu, pa-na-e-khaa-doh, phác chèn, phaknok, phalwaen, rau má, saraswathiaaku, takip-kohol, thalkuri, thankuni, thol-kuri, tilkushi, titjari, tono’itahi, tsubo-kusa, tungchian, vallari, vallarei, vitovitolenge, water pennywort, waternavel, yahon-yahon, yerba de chavos

Description
A slender trailing herb, rooting at the nodes. Leaves 1.3–6.3 cm diameter, orbicular reniform, more or less cupped, entire, crenate or lobulate, glabrous; leaf stalks 2–5 cm long; peduncle about 6 mm, often 2–3 nates; pedicels nil; bractssmall, embracing the flowers; inflorescence in single umbel, bearing 1–5
flowers, sessile, white or reddish; fruit small, compressed, 8mm long, mericarps longer than broad, curved, rounded at top, 7–9-ridged, secondary ridges as prominent as the primary, reticulate between them; pericarp much thickened; seed compressed laterally

Plant material used
aerial part or entire plant

Chemical assays
Contains not less than 2% triterpene ester glycosides (asiaticoside and madecassoside). Determination of asiaticoside and related triterpene ester glycosides by thin-layer chromatography and spectroscopic analysis

Major chemical constituents
The major principles in Herba Centellae are the triterpenes asiatic acid and madecassic acid, and their derived triterpene ester glycosides, asiaticoside and madecassoside

Dosage forms
Dried drug for infusion; galenic preparations for oral administration. Powder or extract (liquid or ointment) for topical application. Package in well-closed, light-resistant containers

Medicinal uses
Uses supported by clinical data
Treatment of wounds, burns, and ulcerous skin ailments, and prevention of keloid and hypertrophic scars. Extracts of the plant have been employed to treat second- and third-degree burns. Extracts have been used topically to accelerate healing, particularly in cases of chronic postsurgical and post-trauma wounds. Extracts have been administered orally to treat stressinduced stomach and duodenal ulcers.

Uses described in pharmacopoeias and well established documents
Herba Centellae is reported to be used in the treatment of leprous ulcers and venous disorders Studies suggest that extracts of Centella asiatica cause regression of inflammatory infiltration of the liver in cirrhosis patients. Further experimentation is needed to confirm these findings.

Uses described in traditional medicine
Therapy of albinism, anaemia, asthma, bronchitis, cellulite, cholera, measles, constipation, dermatitis, diarrhoea, dizziness, dysentery, dysmenorrhoea, dysuria, epistaxis, epilepsy, haematemesis, haemorrhoids, hepatitis, hypertension, jaundice, leukorrhoea, nephritis, nervous disorders, neuralgia, rheumatism, smallpox, syphilis, toothache, urethritis, and varices; and as an antipyretic, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and “brain tonic” agent. Poultices have been used to treat contusions, closed fractures, sprains, and furunculosis

Proven pharmacological activity
Animal studies
Wound healing, Antiulcer

Human studies
Wound healing, Antiulcer, Antileprosy, treatment of venous insufficiency

Contraindications
Allergy to plants of the Apiaceae family.

Warnings
No information available.

Precautions
Carcinogenesis, mutagenesis, impairment of fertility
Asiaticoside has been implicated as a possible skin carcinogen in rodents after repeated topical application. Further experimentation is needed to substantiate this claim.

Other precautions
No information was available concerning drug interactions, drug and laboratory test interactions, teratogenic or non-teratogenic effects on pregnancy, nursing mothers, or paediatric use.

Adverse reactions
Allergic contact dermatitis has been associated with topical application of C. asiatica. However, further testing revealed that these reactions may be due to other ingredients in the preparations .

Posology
Oral dose: 0.33–0.68 g or by oral infusion of a similar amount three times daily

 

Herbal products and services


 

 

 

 

 

Copyright GREEN RING SOCIETY 2008